Projects



Pharmacist George Sidry administers medication to protestors at the Coptic Youth Union protest camp in Maspero, Cairo, May 2011.


A protestor decorates walls of the Coptic Youth Union's makeshift field hospital outside Egypt's state TV station in May 2011. The slogans read 'Breaking news: Egyptian TV has died' - a comment on state TV's failure to portray events accurately.


Members of the Coptic Youth Union organising provisions for the 10 day sit-in staged outside Egyptian TV in May 2011.


Kamal Samuel, 52, a driver from Cairo demonstrates outside the Egyptian state TV building during a 10 day sit-in organised by the Coptic Youth Union in Maspero, Cairo, May 2011.


Images of the Pope of Alexandria adorn boundaries of the 10 day sit-in organised by Egypt's Coptic Youth Union outside Egypt's national TV station in Maspero, Cairo, May 2011.


Women demonstrate against the Egyptian government's failure to prosecute the perpetrators of attacks on Coptic churches across the country at a 10 day sit-in organised by the Coptic Youth Union in Maspero, May 2011.


A Coptic protestor at the Maspero sit-in in May 2011.


Men demonstrate against the Egyptian government's failure to prosecute the perpetrators of attacks on Coptic churches across the country at a 10 day sit-in organised by the Coptic Youth Union in Maspero, May 2011.


A woman demonstrates against the Egyptian government's failure to prosecute the perpetrators of attacks on Coptic churches across the country at a 10 day sit-in organised by the Coptic Youth Union in Maspero, May 2011.


A man sells merchandise at the 10 day Coptic Youth Union sit-in in Maspero, Cairo, May 2011. Images of Nasser, leader of Egypt's 1952 revolution sit side by side with images of Jesus Christ and the Pope of Alexandria.


Barbed wire barricades stop non-sympathisers entering the Coptic sit-in outside Egyptian state TV in Maspero, Cairo, May 2011.


A peaceful protest of 10,000 Christians and their supporters on October 9th 2011 ends in the country's worst night of violence since February, as army tanks ploughed into a 10,000 strong peaceful Christian demonstration. As peaceful protestors escaped, the battle between rioters and the army continued with tactical stone-throwing from the roads and bypasses around Maspero.


As fighting continues, a Coptic Christian shows me his blood-stained clothes and says 'Do you know what they are doing? We are peaceful, we do not carry guns.' The violence that night continued, spreading to Tahrir Square and its tributary streets.


International and local journalists and photographers retreat to a downtown apartment whilst fighting and shooting carries on in the streets. The violence that night left nearly 30 people dead and nearly 300 injured.


Roaming groups of Egyptians take to the streets demanding an end to military rule.


Riot police run across Tahrir Square as fighting between demonstrators and the army continues.


The clean-up operation in Maspero the morning after 'Bloody Sunday.'


A burn-out car in Maspero, the morning after 'Bloody Sunday.'


Riot police in Maspero the morning after 'Bloody Sunday,' 10.10.11


The Monday after 'Bloody Sunday' crowds of mourners and protestors gathered at the Coptic Hospital as it became apparent that 19 of the 26 fatalities the night before were Coptic Christians.


Toni Sabri, one of the leaders of the Coptic Youth Union mourns for his friend and fellow activist, Mina Daniel, killed the night before in the bloody riots.


Friends and family of Ussema Fatri Aziz, 24, prepare for his funeral at the Coptic hospital morgue in Shubra, Cairo, on Monday 10th October 2011.


One of the clerics delegated by the Coptic Church to help victims of 'Bloody Sunday' at the Coptic hospital speaks to a reporter about the previous night's events. Victims' families were advised later that death certificates may have been inaccurate to protect the army, and were revised by independent lawyers and doctors.


Mourners at a candlelit vigil pay their respects to those killed at Maspero, Thursday 13th Oct 2011.


The hands of mourners pay their respects to those killed at Maspero at a candlelit vigil on Thursday 13th Oct 2011. The 19 candles represent the 19 Christians killed on 'Bloody Sunday.'


Mourners at a candlelit vigil pay their respects to those killed at Maspero, Thursday 13th Oct 2011.


A man speaks on TV about 'Bloody Sunday' at a candelit vigil held on Thursday 13th October 2011. Egyptian state TV was heavily criticised by the world's media for inaccurately portraying the events of 'Bloody Sunday,' which included inciting non-protesting Egyptians to take to the streets to defend the army against the 'violent Copts'.


A huge protest and mass took place at the Coptic Cathedral in Cairo the day after the riots of Bloody Sunday. Anguishing and powerful, it was attended by hundreds of Christian and non-Christian supporters.


'Friday is protest day:' a Muslim leader attends a Coptic demonstration from Shubra to Tahrir Square the Friday after 'Bloody Sunday' to show solidarity with the Coptic community and to refute claims by SCAF that sectarian violence was the reason for the riots.


A demonstrator outside the Coptic hospital in Cairo holds an English-language placard. Global and social media have played a huge part in the Egyptian revolution, despite the authorities cutting off internet access and state TV being seen as an arm of the regime.


A demonstrator calls for the fall of Tantawi, leader of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces at a demonstration to Tahrir Square on Friday Oct 14th 2011, and the fight for Coptic rights continues in the interim period leading up to Egypt's first democratic elections. As Fahdy, one Coptic organiser told me: 'I am not angry that Christians or Muslims have died, I am angry that someone has died. I want Egypt to be stable and it's likely that someone will suffer for this - probably the Christians.'

Coptic Christians

October 9th 2011 saw Cairo’s worst violence since the uprising which ousted Mubarak in February. A peaceful protest of 10,000 Coptic Christians and their supporters was violently intercepted by army tanks and bullets, leaving 27 dead and nearly 300 hundred injured. 19 of the fatalities were Copts – a religious minority which makes up between 10 and 20% of Egypt’s population of 82 million, the largest Christian community in the Middle East. Although sectarian violence is common in Egypt, it is widely believed that on ‘Bloody Sunday’ the Supreme Council of Armed Forces took advantage of religious conflict in order to strengthen its hold over the country in the run-up to November’s elections. When I visited Cairo for the first time in May, the Coptic community was organised and protesting against the interim government’s failure to prosecute perpetrators of regular attacks on their churches, but in the face of such long-standing discrimination, it is unclear to what extent their rights will be protected in the new Egypt.